Navigation
Wednesday
Dec262012

Christmas survival tips for parents #6

Enjoy spending time together! For many people, Christmas is really about children. So be glad you have some to spend it with and try and enjoy it and them. Good luck.

Wednesday
Dec262012

Christmas survival tips for parents #5

Don’t loosen up on the rules. Just because it’s Christmas doesn’t mean that your children shouldn’t eat their breakfast, clean their teeth, tidy up, be nice or polite or any of the other things that are important to you. In the same way as you told them when they’d done something good, tell them when they’ve done something you didn’t like and be specific about it. However, don’t get shouty - this just makes you appear out of control and makes children’s behaviour worse. Also, choose your battles, don’t fight over every little thing - it’s just not worth it.

Monday
Dec242012

Christmas survival tips for parents #4

Praise them for doing something good. We all love to be praised and children are no different. Praising your children whenever you can even for very small things will encourage them to produce more good behaviour. However, be very specific about what it is that the child has done well, for example, “it was very kind of you to share your new toy with your brother” (this is of course assuming that the toy has been shared and not bashed over said sibling’s head, in which case see the next point…)

Monday
Dec242012

Christmas survival tips for parents #3

Limit Sugar! This may seem like a totally unrealistic challenge over Christmas when chocolates, puddings and sweets seem to be everywhere. It’s  especially tricky when you’re at other people’s houses and you can’t control the food on offer or don’t want to make a scene when little Billy helps himself to his seventh mince pie. However, try and encourage your children to eat sensibly whenever possible as this will avoid them getting sugar overload and spiralling into the often associated poor behaviour.

Saturday
Dec222012

Christmas survival tips for parents #2

Involve children in visits. Spending lots of time going back and forth visiting relatives can be very boring for children. This is especially true if they don’t know the people very well, they’re not allowed to watch TV and there’s nothing for them to play with. Before you leave for the visit, why not tell your children a titbit about the person you’re visiting which will get them interested in seeing them. For example, “uncle Fred once went on a big boat like the one we read about in your story last night – maybe you could ask him about it when we see him. He might even have some pictures.” Let them choose some appropriate toys to take with them  so they aren’t bored (nothing messy or noisy unless you never want to be invited back), and try and be attentive to them while you are out.